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Several prominent Texas conservatives on Wednesday rallied to the defense of Shelley Luther, the Dallas salon owner who was fined and sentenced to seven days in jail for intentionally violating an order to shutter her business during the COVID-19 outbreak. Gov. Greg Abbott, who’s reopening hair salons on Friday after deeming them nonessential for weeks, said Shelley’s sentence was “excessive,” adding that ...

A new guidance issued by the Texas Attorney General’s Office says that local and county orders cannot prohibit religious organizations from holding in-person worship services ... Judges in Dallas and Harris counties prohibited houses of worship from congregating after Gov. Greg Abbott’s initial executive order mandated that they hold online services ...

A city council in Texas has voted to stop renting out space at the local library to public organizations, essentially canceling the town’s ability to have a “Drag Queen Story Time” for children, a move hailed by pro-family advocates. “These are people who are actually employed at adult nightclubs,” Mary Elizabeth Castle, a policy adviser for Texas Values, a nonprofit organization that promotes faith, family, and freedom, said of the drag queens.

The City Council of Leander, Texas, 22 miles northwest of Austin, voted 5-2 at its Aug. 15 meeting to stop renting out meeting rooms at the library to the public.

“We brought in $1,800 in rental fees and we spent $20,000 in security,” Leander Mayor Troy Hill said, apparently referring to the drag queen event. “That’s not good math to me" ...

The horrible massacre of 31 innocent people a few weeks ago in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, was staggering for Americans. Once again, we witnessed ghastly multiple murders. It is happening regularly, with no end in sight. Though it is heart-wrenching to recall, we must not forget the slaughter of 20 precious kindergartners and 6 adult staff members at Sandy Hook Elementary School, or the killing of 12 teenagers and 1 faculty member at Columbine High School, just a few miles from our home in Colorado.

... It is impossible to overstate the anguish and grief suffered by hundreds of families and friends who have lost loved ones at the hands of wanton killers. And there are even more who are dealing with the trauma and pain of injury, both physical and emotional, stemming from these tragic events. Clearly, America is under siege, and the nation is rightly demanding answers ...

In a few weeks, Texas will relax its restrictions on multiple firearm laws, allowing Texans to have guns and ammunition in public areas. The new changes were passed in the most recent legislative session, which came more than a year after the Santa Fe High School shooting.

Texas has had multiple of the deadliest mass shootings in U.S. history, including the University of Texas in Austin killing spree that introduced the nation to the concept of mass shootings, and the most recent massacre in El Paso that left 22 people dead and dozens injured.

Here are the gun laws going into effect on September 1 ...

27 dead, 20 wounded. An estimated 700 rounds unleashed by a gunman at the defenseless members of the First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs.

A year and a half later, state lawmakers lifted the prohibition on licensed concealed carry within Texas churches. With the law set to take effect this Sunday, Dave Welch, leader of the thousand member Texas Pastor Council, welcomed the right to fight fire with fire in defense of the vulnerable.

"There's a clear message to potential perpetrators that if churches across the board have people in the church that are carrying, that are licensed, that are trained and prepared, that it is less likely that someone will attempt to engage," said Welch ...

With lawmakers coming to Austin with a $10.5 billion surplus, Texas homeowners were excited about the prospect of substantial property tax relief. While they eventually received what might be considered a down payment on tax relief, they narrowly staved off efforts by Republicans to increase taxes.

At the beginning of the 86th Texas Legislature, the Capitol was abuzz with comity and cheeriness. With House Speaker Joe Straus out of the way, conservatives believed their reforms could have greater success, and with Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick striking a gentler tone, establishment lawmakers were hopeful they’d be able to ...