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President Trump tweeted an order that would disqualify most transgender people from serving in the military.

The reason—the White House says troops with a history of "gender dysphoria present considerable risk to military effectiveness and lethality."

Current service members who are transgender but have not undergone re-assignment surgery will be allowed to stay in the military as long as they have been medically stable for three years in their biological sex before joining the military. Those who require or have already had gender re-assignment surgery will be disqualified from service.

A contentious race continues to heat up in the final days before the May 6 election in a Texas school district where dedicated progressives hope to unseat several incumbents on one of the state’s most conservative school boards.

Perhaps, the stakes have never been higher in the Humble Independent School District, which serves more than 40,000 students and covers 90-plus square miles including the communities of Humble, Kingwood, Atascocita, Fall Creek, and Summerwood. The district sits roughly 17 miles northeast of downtown Houston.

Eight-year-old Timmy Schultz stood in the parking lot across from Kingwood United Methodist Church, surrounded by about 150 people in lime green shirts that read "Timmy's Fun Run For Foster Families."

It was a moment he predicted.

Timmy Schultz was adopted as a baby by his mother, Tammy Schultz. After participating in a charity fun run when he was four, Timmy Schultz told his mother he wanted to have a fun run to help children get adopted.

I recently pulled the campaign finance reports for one particular Houston City Council member for the last five years. I am not going to identify the council member because that member’s contributions would not be substantially different from the other members.

Over the five years, the council member raised over $220,000. Of this amount, at least 86% came from special interests. The largest share came from contractors and vendors doing business with the City at 42%. Real estate interests which have regulatory issues before the City came in second at 19%....

There will be nine awards totaling $7,500! Six scholarships awarded at $1000 each and three stipends awarded at $500 each.

The Holocaust Remembrance Scholarships, are created in honor of Holocaust survivors, Leizer and Rose Horowitz. Educating and empowering students to become ambassadors of breaking the veil of silence surrounding the issues of the Holocaust is a key goal. The world needs future leaders to actively do their part to stop current prejudices and prevent future atrocities.
The March of Remembrance is a part of the Global March of Life, where memorial walks are taken annually throughout the world on Holocaust Remembrance Day. The 2018 Houston area event will occur on Sunday, April 15th, near Rice University. Details including location and times TBD. Check March event page.

A Birdville school district teacher has been disciplined after assigning sixth-grade students a survey that asked them to rate their comfort level with being asked to visit a gay bar or having a Palestinian-Muslim roommate.

The questionnaire titled, "How Comfortable Am I," was not age-appropriate for sixth-grade students, according to several parents from North Richland Middle interviewed by Star-Telegram media partner WFAA. The middle school is in North Richland Hills.

A Baptist pastor in Dallas is facing some harsh realities more than a year after leading his congregation to affirm homosexuality.

In November 2016, Wilshire Baptist Church voted to extend membership to those involved in the homosexual lifestyle. The church's slogan is now "Open to all, closed to none."

The action prompted the Baptist General Convention of Texas to sever ties with the church. A year later, Chelsen Vicari decided to contact senior pastor George Mason to see how the church has been affected by the change.

Former Houston mayor Annise Parker is the new president and CEO of the Gay & Lesbian Victory Fund, a nonprofit organization focused on identifying and electing LGBTQ people to public office.

Parker is intimately familiar with the organization because her earliest campaigns for Houston City Council were supported by the Victory Fund after it was founded in 1991. The group’s backing eventually helped Parker become the first openly LGBTQ person elected mayor of a major U.S. city, in 2009.

Now, Parker is checking off another “first” as the first elected official to lead the Victory Fund. She takes over for Aisha Moodie-Mills, who announced her departure during the group’s International LGBTQ Leaders Conference on December 8.

Houston Magazine OutSmart reports that at least 35 LGBTQ Texans are running for office in the 2018 primary and general elections–including governor and lieutenant governor contests. Five candidates identify as transgender. More than one-third are from Harris County. The publication added five to the list by Wednesday afternoon.
The publication began the article by stating:

With equality under attack by the Trump administration and the Texas Legislature, LGBTQ candidates across the state are lining up to fight back.

We recently had a major victory for Houston taxpayers and religious liberty. In the case we filed years ago regarding Mayor Parker’s unlawful use of taxpayer dollars to fund same-sex benefits, the U.S. Supreme Court recently rejected the City of Houston’s request to review whether Houston taxpayers may challenge the city’s policy of providing spousal benefits to the homosexual partners of city employees. The opposition was lead by former Chief Justice of the Texas Supreme Court, Wallace Jefferson.